9 Questions to Ask When Updating Your Website


Most service professionals consider a web site as a necessary part of doing business these days. A 3-7 page brochure type web site provides straight forward information to potential clients looking for information.

A brochure type site usually includes pages such as “Services”, “About”, and “Media Room” in addition to the Home page.

My primary site is a brochure type web site. I want visitors to understand what I offer and learn enough about me to want more information.

Unfortunately, updating this type of site usually requires an experienced web person. Most of us are busy running our businesses and don’t have the time to think about updating our sites unless something is drastically wrong with it.

The site is created and that’s the end of that. But as your business changes, your web site should reflect those changes. That doesn’t necessarily mean that you need a total makeover. It does mean your need to take a fresh look at your site at least once a year.

This review should not take long. Delegate it to your assistant or another team member so you get a fresh perspective. I’ve listed 9 questions to ask as you review your site. This list is not all-inclusive but it does touch on some of the key information that I frequently see outdated on web sites.

1. Is the look and feel of your site consistent with your business as it exists now? Does the site design look current or does it look like it’s from the early days of the web? Tastes and expectations of a site have changed as the web has matured.

2.Does your home page text reflect the benefits of your services as they exist today? Your core business may not have changed much, but you and your clients may have identified additional benefits of your services or you may have added services that provide additional benefits that your visitor should know.

3.Do your page categories still make sense or do you need to add or change them? For example, if Resources is one of the categories on your navigation bar but you don’t have time to keep the page current, maybe you should consider using a different category.

4.Does your web site text talk to readers about their concerns and minimize “we/us/our”? In the past, web sites focused on only telling their own story. Readers still want to know about you but first they want to know what you can do for them.

5.Have you read your privacy policy recently to make sure it reflects any changes made to your site? For example, if you created your privacy policy prior to selling products, you want to make sure that your policy addresses the security and privacy of payment information.

6.If you have testimonials on your site, is the web site information for them still accurate? Make sure the people who provided testimonials still have active sites. If they don’t, consider removing the testimonial or updating the information.

7.Is the contact information on your site accurate? Check phone numbers and addresses and confirm nothing has changed

8.Is your “About” page current? Can you add additional credentials that reflect your increasing expertise? Add any new organizations you’ve joined or recognition you’ve received.

9.Are all of the links and forms on your site still working? Click on each link to make sure it still works. Complete each form to make sure that it still serves its purpose.

Checking your site annually will help maintain your professional reputation.



Source by Nancy D Waring


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